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  • Kimberly Hughes
Lisa Wallin
Kimberly Hughes

Kimberly Hughes, originally from the southwestern U.S. desert, is a freelance writer covering arts and culture, travel, and social features from Japan and beyond. She is also a translator, university educator and community organizer. She can often be found with her laptop in the cafés of the metropolis, and when she is not working/drinking coffee, she loves trying out new recipes with the veggies from her home garden. Besides Japanese, she speaks French, Spanish and Portuguese, and wonders if she will ever be able to wrap her brain around Italian.

Articles by Kimberly

For those living in Tokyo or other metropolitan locales, it can be easy to lose touch with the traditional cycles that often underpin rural life. Reconnect with these natural rhythms in Shimane…

Practically sitting on Taiwan’s doorstep, these islands are the tropical getaway you have been longing for. Your first stop, Ishigaki, is accessible via direct flights from Japan’s mainland. Although we saved our…

As the pandemic continues many of us have found ourselves newly exploring wellness options — or perhaps renewing an existing interest in this area. And while travel is currently still not advisable,…

2020 has been an unsettling year, with many of us searching for meaning and comfort. For a dose of wisdom and inspiration, we chat with 89-year-old poet Masao Ogatsu who has been…

As I sit down with Peter Barakan in an artsy Roppongi café, a barristo mentions that the DJ’s set was his hands-down favorite at last summer’s Fuji Rock festival. Later, Barakan is…

The Seto Inland Sea, or Setouchi region, offers gorgeous nature and edgy, thought-provoking art all in one locale. Out of 3,000 islands, we’ve picked out a few of our recommended must-sees and…

A visit to Shimane Prefecture, which hugs the Sea of Japan coastline in Honshu island’s southwesterly San’in region, defies easy categorization. Accessible by car in just 90 minutes from Hiroshima, the prefecture nevertheless still…

Many years ago, Edo-era travelers making their way between the Edo region (present-day Tokyo) and the ancient capital of Kyoto followed the 500 km-long Tokaido route – on foot. The road was…