Enjoy an instructor lead painting session complete with wine and snacks. Come relax with your friendly group of instructors in either English or Japanese, with new events and collaborations added weekly. All you need to think about is where you will hang your masterpiece. How Much: From ¥2,000 Address: 7-2 Daikanyamacho, Shibuya-ku Website: artbar.co.jp

Tokyo Piano School’s mission is to offer affordable private piano lessons in Tokyo for adults and kids from beginner to advanced through personalized one-on-one sessions at their studio or at domicile. Tokyo Piano School helps guide and foster students in a range of different musical styles including: classical, pop, jazz and musical theatre. They also prepare students for university and conservatory entrance auditions, music school exams, ABRSM exams, PTNA exams, recitals, and competitions. All potential students receive a discounted trial lesson to evaluate their current musical level, and to discuss goals and future piano aspirations. How Much: Starting from ¥3,000 Address:  6 Chome-8-29 Roppongi, Minato-ku Website: www.tokyopianoschool.jp/en/ Tel: 070-4455-4748

This restaurant and show is a permanent location designed especially for fans of Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon, the cult classic manga-turned-anime by Naoko Takeuchi. Here, visitors can enjoy seasonal menus, themed cocktails based on their favorite Sailor Scout and enjoy a live performance introducing the original cast. Reservation required. How Much: ¥3,500-¥8,500 Address: 1-10 Azabujuban, Minato-ku Website: sailormoon-shiningmoontokyo.com ///lizards.tangible.jogged

Sayama green tea traces its history back to the 14th century, and is famous among tea lovers for its supreme taste. Sayama Green Tea School in Saitama Prefecture was started to preserve the local tea culture for the next generation. Experience a range of programs – from picking tea leaves to roasting leaves to brewing the perfect cup of green tea – at the school's five family-operated tea farms – Sayama Farm, Okutomi Farm, Yokota Farm, Nishizawa Farm and Ikenoya Farm. International guests are welcome and anyone can participate, even if they have never had a sip of green tea. For addresses and directions to their tea farms, please call or check the website below. Website: sayamagreenteaschool.com/?lang=en Tel: 04-2941-6700 | 090-6075-1817 Email: [email protected]

How Much: from ¥3,400 Address: 76-3 Oze, Seki City, Gifu Prefecture Website: ozeukai.net    Tel: 0575-22-2506

Discover a new side to Kawasaki City through bus or boat tours through the city’s factory zone at night. At night, these grey industrial buildings turn into shining beacons that light up the bay, creating an otherworldly futuristic experience you won’t find anywhere else. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moAVcTZco70 For a more traditional experience, drop by the Japan Open-air Folk House Museum. Enjoy an indigo dyeing experience, traditional storytelling, and other traditional cultural highlights here. How Much: from ¥4,000 (for Factory Zone Night Tour by boat) Address: Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki City Website: k-kankou.jp/travelkawasaki/factory/    Tel: 03-6866-9608

Walking into Suigian is like stepping back in time to the Edo period. Here you’ll experience short noh and kyogen stage performances, as well as gagaku and Nihon buyo dances and more. Before the show begins, a brief presentation of the highlights of the evening will ensure you have a good understanding of the stories woven on stage. With all seats close to the stage, you can enjoy the splendor of the music and costumes up close. Guests can also speak with the performers after the show and take pictures with them, making it an experience to remember. Temporarily closed due to covid-19 in 2020. How Much: from ¥5,000 per person, plus one drink Address: B1F 2-5-10, Nihonbashi-Muromachi, Chuo-ku Website: suigian.jp/en/    Tel: 03-3527-9378

Website: airbnb.com/experiences/52991

Website: calligraphyclasstokyo.com

Wayo Udoyoshi teaches Shodo calligraphy lessons in the wayo style - a uniquely Japanese form of calligraphy from the Heian period that developed from the female writing style. Wayo uses hiragana, Japan’s sound-based alphabet, making it a more readable form of writing than using kanji alone. Website: shodo.tokyo

Address: 3-7 Nisshincho, Kawasaki, Kanagawa Prefecture 210-0024 Website: warehousenet.jp Tel: 044-246-2360

The escape room Nazobako in Asakusa embodies a measured style of game. With a generous time limit and all the clues within arms reach it is a test of pure deductive reasoning. There are three different types of room, each with a unique theme. The Samurai room is a small space filled to the brim with puzzles. It is based around an assassination attempt against your lord and in contrast to other venues, the Samurai room leads to a conclusion that relies on the player having kept up with the story. It may sound vague, but saying any more would spoil the ending. These rooms are best played in groups as there is a surprising breadth of puzzles crammed into the space, making the room difficult to complete by yourself. Luckily there are envelopes containing clues placed next to the puzzles and you can ask staff for some extra pointers if you really have no idea what to do next. Hours: 10:00-20:30 How Much: ¥8,280~¥17,100 Address: 6F KN Asakusa Bldg., 1-10-5 Asakusa, Taito-ku Website: nazobako.jp Tel: 03-6231-6621

“You must eliminate Black Max and rescue the scientist,” says the severe looking agent on the TV screen. You have been invited into the world of espionage at InSPYre, an escape room in the heart of Shinjuku. The subtly named InSPYre is a venue that pits the player against the evil Black Max organization. With nothing but a handy tablet device, the player must solve puzzles in order to thwart a variety of nefarious plans. The play area is an open space that holds a number of smaller rooms, locks, corridors and tunnels that hide dozens and dozens of puzzles and traps. The time limit is ten minutes, which makes this particular venue more of an action focussed espionage thriller than some of more cerebral offerings. Tasks are randomized every time you play and a typical run could be anything from breaking into a lab to steal something, then remotely unlocking a door to escape - to freeing a scientist before crawling your way to freedom. One of the challenges is usually physical, which might require dodging lasers or checking security cameras for clues. These can be incredibly difficult, especially if you are over six feet tall, but the relief of completing puzzles under pressure is the allure. After 11PM you can buy a night pass, which allows you to play as many times as you want before the morning trains.  Depending on how your Friday night went this might be a fun alternative to karaoke. Hours: 11am–5am How Much: ¥980~¥3,980 Address: 6F Humax Pavilion, 1-20-1 Kabukicho, Shinjuku-ku Website: inspyre.jp    Tel: 03-5155-1481

Tokyo Mystery Circus is a venue that offers a wide range of games. The focus is on the puzzles, with only a few being escape rooms in the traditional sense. Their newest attraction is a projection mapping game called The Magic Library’s Bizarre Encyclopedia, where up to five players sit around a table and solve puzzles to seal away escaped magical creatures. The premise is simple, but the integration of technology and funky visuals make it somewhat unique in the genre. The English language version of The Magic Library opens on December the 4th. A far more orthodox game involves escaping from a prison cell with nothing but the handful of objects given to you. ‘Escape from the Prison’ is self-explanatory, with the entire escape game philosophy boiled down into a single ten-minute game. If you have never tried an escape game before, this is a great place to start. The other English language game is based on Metal Gear Solid, replete with characters and technology from the series. Much like the video game, the objective is to sneak around and avert global catastrophe by finding keys and codes. Players are encouraged to interact with actors in order to complete their goals, adding a fun twist to the genre. If you can speak Japanese there are many more games you can play, just make sure your Japanese is really good. Tokyo Mystery Circus is always updating their games so be sure to check online for availability. Hours: Weekdays: 11:30-22:00 | Weekends & holidays: 9:30-22:00 How Much: ¥1,400~¥7,200 Address: 1-27-5 Kabukicho, Shinjuku-ku Website: mysterycircus.jp

How Much: ¥3,780~¥12,960 Address: 2-17-13, Nishi-Asakusa, Taito-ku, 111-0035 Website: chagohan.tokyo    Tel: 03-6802-8248

Lonely Planet-recommended and 2018 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence recipient, this vegetarian/vegan/halal/kosher-friendly cooking school with studios in Yushima and Jinbocho (location depends on day) offers hands-on washoku, traditional and decorative sushi, okonomiyaki, bento boxes, sukiyaki with Wagyu beef, and wagashi classes. This is a great choice for those new to Japanese cooking and those looking to learn homestyle dishes. How Much: ¥5,500~¥10,000 Address: For Yushima studio: 3-31-2, Yushima, Bunkyo.  For Jinbocho studio: 2-4-3, Jinbocho, Chiyoda. Website: https://buddhabelliestokyo.jimdo.com/   Tel: 80-5001-9395

Award-winning cookbook author, food writer, and culinary ambassador Elizabeth Andoh offers hands-on classes as well as intensive workshops on washoku fundamentals from her Setagaya kitchen; for those unable to attend in person, she also offers a class through the Craftsy platform. This culinary arts program is perfect for those looking for a deeper exploration of ingredients, preparation and presentation techniques, and traditional foodways. Website: tasteofculture.com  

Cozily tucked inside Restaurant Shojin Sougo in the heart of Roppongi, Tokyo Cook brings together some of Tokyo’s top culinary professionals from a variety of specialties (soba, sushi, tempura, kaiseki, shojin ryori). Michelin-starred chef and owner Daisuke Nomura (formerly executive chef at Daigo and one of PlantForward’s Global 50) and Tokyo Cook founder Kazumi Masuda envisioned the school as a natural extension of Shojin Sougo. With a wide range of both one-day and intensive courses, Tokyo Cook offers courses not commonly found in other cooking schools, such as seasonal kaiseki and popular and seasonal shojin ryori, where students learn basic shojin ryori cooking methods, philosophy, and history. Ample English-language handouts with recipes, ingredient backgrounds, and color photos are provided, and all classes include complimentary drinks and dessert served alongside the dishes made in class. Address: Roppongi Green Building, 3F, 6-1-8 Roppongi, Minato-ku, 106-0032 Website: tokyo-cook.com   Tel: 03-5414-2727