Located just outside exit 5 of Meijijingumae Station, Buttermilk Channel hums with funky blues and jazz music, its off-white and blue decor, with brick-wall accents, offering a minimalistic yet refreshing ambiance – and immediately conjuring up a Brooklyn vibe. The new bistro, opened in September 2018, offers dishes inspired by American comfort food staples just like its mother branch back in Brooklyn. Between the Buttermilk Pancakes, Pecan Pie French Toast, Fried Chicken and Waffles or Duck Meatloaf, you’ll be sure to leave with that feel-good satisfaction. Whether you’re feeling home sick, need a break from Japanese foods, or just looking to get a taste of New York City, Buttermilk Channel fills the gap. Address: 1-11-11 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku Website: buttermilkchannel-jp.com    Open: Mon-Sun 10am-11:30pm (L.O.: 10:30pm)

Just off the picturesque Philosopher's Path, you'll find Yojiya Cafe Ginkakuji inside an old machiya — an expansive wooden townhouse typical of the Kyoto area. Here you can lounge in style as you take in the view of the traditional garden and imagine what it would have been like to live here when it was still a private home. Walk across the garden after your relaxing escape from hectic sightseeing to drop by the Yojiya shop, located in the same area. Here you'll find typical Yojiya products such as face oil blotting sheets, but also limited edition skincare items and seasonal sweets to take home and share with friends. Address: 15 Shishitagani, Honenin-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto Website: www.yojiya.co.jp/english/    Tel: 075-754-0017

Originally located in Ueno, kushiage restaurant Hantei Nezu Honten relocated to the Nezu area in 1978. Since then it has been serving mouthwatering deep-fried skewers of vegetables and meat in a traditional home hailing from the Meiji Period (1868-1912). The house is a rarity — it's a three-story structure that boasts official cultural heritage certification. — and with good reason: the building miraculously survived the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, the firebombing of Tokyo during WWII, and avoided demolition by hungry developers after that. Hantei exudes a relaxing atmosphere typical of old traditional homes and boasts an excellent view of the shitamachi streets surrounding it from the second and third floors. Given its spacious interior — including a storehouse inside the main building — it's perfect for large parties as well as more intimate date nights. Address: 2-12-15 Nezu, Bunkyo-ku Website: hantei.co.jp    Tel: 03-3828-1440

This hip communal space welcomes TRUNK(HOTEL) guests and neighbors as well as nomadic workers and creators who utilize the space for work and business meetings. There are also daily events and workshops held in this unique space, which features a comfortable lounge area with sofas and long tables and a buzzing bar counter. The bar serves signature cocktails exclusive to TRUNK(LOUNGE) made by skilled mixologists . Whether you’re here for work or relaxation, TRUNK(LOUNGE) serves as a home base for the community where guests can mingle with like-minded individuals. Created with TRUNK’s signature ingenuity, the lounge boasts a selection of highly functional furniture, a well-curated soundtrack, delicious drinks – and inspiring people. Address: 5-31 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku Website: trunk-hotel.com/lounge/ Tel: 03-5766-3210

The idea behind this classic contemporary restaurant located at TRUNK(HOTEL) was inspired by the local food culture of kushi (grilled skewers). Known as Shibuya's soul food, grilled skewers became popular during the postwar period when food stalls were abundant in the neighborhood and this tasty street snack – typically made with chicken – was a source of comfort for those living in difficult times. Traditional grilled skewer eateries are abound in Tokyo today, and TRUNK(KUSHI) hopes to continue offering this tasty soul food to both locals and visitors. To ensure the best quality, TRUNK(KUSHI) prepares its dishes under the guidance of chefs from the long-established restaurant Yakiniku Yuji. The restaurant pays a great deal of attention to preparation and grilling, as techniques vary depending on the ingredients served on each skewer. Address: 5-31 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku Website: trunk-hotel.com/kushi/ Tel: 03-5766-3205

Located inside TRUNK(HOTEL) in Tokyo’s Shibuya district, this restaurant combines Japanese and Western cuisines to create health-conscious, multicultural dishes. TRUNK(KITCHEN) offers a variety of lunch and dinner offerings enhanced with locally sourced ingredients. Promoting social awareness through example is a core element of TRUNK(HOTEL), and this principle is expressed at TRUNK(KITCHEN). The restaurant uses seasonal ingredients such as seafood, meat and organic vegetables. Vegetarian and gluten-free options are available. Enjoy not only a range of delicious meals, but also be rest assured that you are making healthy and environmentally friendly choices. Address: 5-31 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku Website: trunk-hotel.com/kitchen/ Tel: 03-5766-3202

Inspired by Japan’s bloody civil war, Sengoku Buyuden is a Japanese izakaya-style restaurant riddled with battle flags and replica samurai armor, and boasting an exciting traditional menu, which will make history buffs and gourmets feel at home. The restaurant is a great place for kids, tourists, and Japan lifers to learn a bit about one of Japan’s most violent periods while being surrounded by a surprisingly sophisticated atmosphere. We recommend the Tenka Touitsu Seiro Mushi, a bamboo-steamed dish with a choice of either pork, chicken, or seafood, which is a healthy meal that’ll have you fit for a fight. Pair with one (or more) of the 30 types of high-quality shochu to cancel out your battle-ready state. Address: 4F T-Wing Bldg., 1-6-2 Kabuki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Website: dd-holdings.jp    Tel: 03-3209-2277

Inspired by Antonio Inoki, a legendary pro wrestler, who even won a match against Muhammed Ali in 1976, is the inspiration for this bar — complete with a museum — featuring live shows and a Janken (Rock, Paper, Scissors) championship, where the winner gets to wear Inoki’s champion belt. Most of the food offered at Antonio Inoki Sakaba is mega-sized (with smaller portions available). Highlights include the Michinoku Driver, a super thick Sendai-style gyutan, and the Antonio Ribs, grilled to perfection in a rotisserie oven in-store. Inoki himself also occasionally drops by, so if you are lucky, you might even have a chance to see the legend in person. Address: 1F Denen Bldg., 4-1-13 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Website: antonioinokisakaba.owst.jp    Tel: 03-3354-1339

Muscles are the name of the game at the beefiest joint in the city. Opened in 2016, this “muscle entertainment” bar boasts bulging biceps and chiseled jaws as part of the service. It uses a simple system – it’s an all-you-can-drink service for 90 minutes. There’s no food on the menu, so you can bring your own — just don’t bring anything too pungent. There are extra options outside of the all-you-can-drink menu, including protein drinks (of course) and a special Omotenashi menu that includes a “muscle sandwich” — we’ll leave what that is to your imagination — and an Ohime-dakko, where you can literally get swept off your feet. Address: B1F Iwazawa Bldg., 3-20-9 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo Website: muscle-ent.jimdo.com    Tel: 03-6886-7001

Ramen Kamuro has the atmosphere of a warm, time-worn ramen restaurant with a modern, refined edge. Opened in 2016, chicken is king at this ramen shop conveniently located two minutes from Ebisu Station. The house specialty ramen features tender, juicy chicken raised chemical-free in Japan. The clear and delicate broth has a flavor reminiscent of healthy, homemade chicken soup. The bountiful locally sourced vegetables, from flavor-bursting fruit tomatoes to crisp green beans, enhance the farm-fresh, hearty helpings. Open daily from 11:30am-4am, the affordable Ramen Kamuro is a convenient spot for lunch, dinner or an after hours pick-me-up. Read our full review here. How Much: ¥800 to ¥1,150 Address: 1-7-11 Ebisunishi, Shibuya-ku Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1303/A130302/13202652/ Tel: 03-6416-5169

Tucked away on the third floor of an ageing building, at the end of two narrow veins of Harajuku’s throbbing heart, lies a juicy slice of North America: Harry’s Sandwich Co. at Cafe Roots. Designed and conceived by San Francisco native Harry Stanwood, this eatery provides one of Tokyo’s few true breaks from Japanified foreign foods. Raised in the Bay Area, Harry brings to his sandwiches attention to detail and a well thought-out composition. His take on the classic Meatball Hero sub, for example, includes meatballs made from his father’s recipe, homemade marinara sauce, and carefully selected mozzarella cheese, which, all-combined, provides a delicious trip through space and time. The restaurant also dedicates a full third of its menu to vegetarian tastes; from the classic comfort-food Grilled Cheese to the savoury Caprese, to the domestic flavours of the Nassu. Address: 1-16-7 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku Website: www.facebook.com/harryssandwichco    Open: Wednesday to Monday from 12:00 - 23:00. Closed on Tuesdays.

Address: 7F Tokyo Solamachi Town East, 1-1-2,Oshigami, Sumida-ku Website: sushitsune.co.jp    Tel: 03-5809-7083

Steeped in the rich tradition of Kyoto, Shimogamo Saryo’s satellite shop in Ginza offers a unique opportunity to savor the old capital’s cuisine in Tokyo. The restaurant’s name Higashi no Hanare means “the eastern detachment,” indicating Shimogamo Saryo’s dedication to its roots in the ancient capital while making room for some modern Tokyo flair. The Kyoto-based executive chef arranges the menus for both Kyoto and Ginza locations to ensure the spirit of Shimogamo Saryo holds true even in the east, and features seasonal options and ample Kyoto-sourced vegetables. A great believer in maintaining tradition when needed and innovating when it’s not, the Ginza outfit serves Kyoto classics with an innovative twist in an intimate environment, perfect for dates nights or casual business dinners. Address: 11F Tokyu Plaza Ginza, 5-2-1 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo Website: shimogamosaryo.co.jp/ginza Tel: 070-5345-5761

An expansive restaurant with a garden in a traditional vein, Shimogamo Saryo opened in 1856, originally located inside the grounds of Kyoto’s Shimogamo Shrine. Now located a three-minute walk away, Shimogamo Saryo still maintains a close relationship with the shrine and its visitors, who have ranged from politicians to the very gods themselves. Traditions are important here – from the executive chef and staff praying at the well in the garden each morning before work, to tea ceremony experiences offered to the sado savvy and novices alike. At Shimogamo Saryo, both locals and visitors can sample true traditional Kyoto kaiseki fare, which uses delectable Kyoto-sourced vegetables as a base. Address: 62 Shimogamomiyagawa-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto Website: shimogamosaryo.co.jp   Tel: 075-701-5185

Opened in Shibuya in June 2018, Yotsu Bar is a casual standing bar serving a range of fruit sour cocktails and some light dishes. There are 10 different sour flavors including lemon, kiwi, watermelon, melon, orange, grapefruit, dragon fruit, mango, blueberry and strawberry. Prices start at a very reasonable ¥500. The drinks are not only Insta-worthy, they also taste great. The fruits are all carefully selected by the long established and highly respected store Futaba Fruit. For those feeling a bit peckish the stewed red meat with red wine and blueberries comes highly recommended. As does the oil-marinated oysters dish. Across from Yotsu Bar on the second floor of the New Art Building there are three rooms that can be rented by groups, so you can enjoy the fruit cocktails in a more private setting or bring your own drinks and food from outside. The rooms cost between ¥1,500 for an hour to ¥3,500 and include a shared kitchen. On the fifth floor of the building there is a large tatami room and kitchen that can also be rented. From August 2018 it will be used as rented accommodation. Address: New Art Bldg. 2F, 5-30-3 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku

A barbeque experience that not only tastes amazing but is also educational, Weber Park is a great place for meat and craft beer-lovers to visit during the scorching summer months. Located on the roof of Odaiba's Aqua City overlooking Rainbow Bridge, customers can enjoy the various dishes on offer while taking in Tokyo's stunning skyline. There are three sumptuous courses to choose from; Japanese Traditional, American Classic and European Resort. All feature a range of mouth-watering meat dishes. Depending on your choice there's also yakisoba, smoked salmon and salad as well as side dishes and dessert. A la carte is also available. The ingredients are prepared in advance for customers so all you have to do is turn up and throw the food on the charcoal and gas grills. The temperatures are set and there's a stop watch to make sure the meat is cooked to perfection. An expert is also on hand to check that everything's going smoothly. At the grill academy you can get some barbequing advice from experts, and there's a museum where you can buy grills and barbeque-related goods. Address: Rooftop, Aqua City Odaiba, 1-7-1 Daiba, Minato-ku Tokyo Website: http://www.weberpark.com  

Although not completely vegan, this Thai joint in Shimokitazawa offers vegan options and the owner understands what vegans do and don’t eat. The main meals are deliciously spicy, and the desserts are a must try! (The restaurant also homes a very chilled-out cat.) Address: 5−29−8 Daizawa, Setagaya-ku Website: tit-chai.com    Tel: 03-3411-01418

Address: 4-27-10-5 Hayamiya, Nerima-ku, Tokyo Website: www.litorukka.com    Tel: 090-9312-2031