Shop Japan #3: Our Monthly Roundup of Artisanal Japanese Gifts and Souvenirs

Looking for something quintessentially Japanese for that perfect gift or souvenir? Each month, we round up some of our favorite artisanal items made by local craftsmen and designers. September is all about textiles, towels, clothing and stylish accessories…

Tsutsumu Document Case by Syrinx

Letting you carry and present your business papers in style, this document case was brought to life based on the traditional Japanese aesthetic of wrapping, or “tsutsumu.” While the case uses only a single piece of leather, tanned with a traditional technique from Italy, its simple design is the epitome of Japanese minimalism.

¥27,000, syrinx.audio

Fuku-Fuku Gauze by Ficelle

Made from a six-layer gauze and woven with three different types of thread, Fuku-Fuku Gauze is manufactured in the Mikawa region of Aichi Prefecture, known since the Edo period for its textile and weaving industry. Because of its soft texture and its versatile all-year-round usage, this will be your offspring’s favorite new fashion item.

¥540-¥10,584, www.ficelle.co.jp

Kyochijimi by Yamashiro

Originally produced for kimono undergarments, Chijimi is an elasticated fabric
made of 100% cotton, which is created by twisting the weft yarn during weaving.
In addition to being stretchy, the fabric dries fast because the area where it comes in contact with the skin is small, making it the perfect fabric for the extremely hot and humid summers of Japan.

¥1,500-¥16,000, yamashiro.biz

Kagoshima Shirt and Kagoshima Kuro Shirt by Koyama Choya Sewing

These dress shirts are made with Oshima Tsumugi fabric from Kagoshima Prefecture, processed with wrinkle-free technology, and created using a unique technique of individually dying each string of cotton according to the shirt’s design before it is woven, minimizing not only discoloration but also shrinkage when washing at home.

¥8,532, www.miraishirt.com

Hosokawa’s Happiness Scarf by Hosokawa Woollen Textile

This scarf is produced using a difficult process of weaving ultrathin cashmere into a feather-light fabric, which is then dyed in soft colors using only natural Japanese dyes. What’s unique about this product is not just its exquisite texture and quality, but the company’s guarantee to offer repairs and a free-of-charge maintenance service.

¥21,600-¥38,880, since1910.jp

Hiragana by Hiragana

Rediscover the beauty of Japanese characters through this elegant jewelry, designed and polished by a Japanese artist and calligrapher who wanted to convey the beauty of hiragana. Each piece expresses a unique message, innovatively designed to emphasize the characters’ shapes.

¥15,120-¥432,000, www.saorikunihiro.com

Golden Colored Silk Clutch Bag by Okamoto Orimono

Produced in Kyoto Prefecture, Nishijin textile is a luxurious fabric that traditionally adorned the obi belts of ceremonial kimonos and decorated Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines. Using the same exquisite fabric, these golden-colored and compact silk clutches combine the beauty of traditional craftsmanship and luxurious textile design into a fashionable and modern must-have accessory.

¥39,960-¥47,520, okamotoorimono.com

Setouchi Flower Hand Towel by Cresson

Handmade by craftsmen in Okayama Prefecture, these intricate hand towels are adorned with some of Japan’s most prominent flowers like daffodils and cherry blossoms. Each flower is traditionally used to convey messages such as “harmonious marriage” or “success in love.”

¥3,500-¥4,500, cresson1986.com

Credea Cotton Towel by Tsubame Towel

Developed in an effort to create a towel that is both eco-friendly and luxurious, the Credea Cotton Towel is made using a unique technique of adding starch-derived glue to the fabric, giving the towel both strength and exceptional softness.

¥864-¥4,320, www.tsubame-towel.com



All featured products are part of Omotenashi Selection, a project that brings together fine handcrafted items from around Japan and shares them with international audiences.

For more info, go to omotenashinippon.jp/selection/en


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