Five Reasons to Choose The British School in Tokyo

Asked why they chose The British School in Tokyo (BST) for their sons and daughters, many of our parents say that the children here are cheerful, grounded, at ease with themselves and each other – and excited by the challenges set before them. They might add that the school succeeds in balancing high academic expectation with a wealth of extra-curricular opportunity, all founded on the highest standards of pastoral care and a deep commitment to the needs and enthusiasms of the individual. We take a deeper look at some of the top reasons why BST is becoming the first choice for many families.

No Stereotypes

From their early years in our Nursery and Reception classes, all children are valued for who they are and given the freedom to develop the independence and resilience that will enable them to take the next step in their education wherever it might take them, with confidence and a smile. In essence, BST is a school and a community where there will never be stereotypes.

High Standards

The British School in Tokyo is an accredited member of the Council of British International Schools and one of only a small number of schools worldwide to have been independently inspected according to the UK standards for British Schools Overseas, and judged to be excellent in every category. Situated on two central sites at the heart of this vibrant city, this year for the first time in its history, the school is home to over 1,000 students.

“For the first time in its history, the school is home to over 1,000 students”

There are many reasons to explain the remarkable surge in student enrolment at BST in recent years but foremost among them is the widespread recognition that this is a school where young people of all abilities from the most diverse backgrounds can find their niche and fulfil their potential.

Since 2012 we have seen the number of 15 to 18-year-old students on our IGCSE and A Level courses more than double to almost 250; examination results have progressed to the point where they match the gold standard set by the United Kingdom independent sector and our graduates are winning places at some of the most prestigious universities around the world.

Top Teachers

The very best schools, of course, are built on the talent, enthusiasm and experience of outstanding teachers. At BST we recruit staff with great care, almost exclusively from the UK and from select British-style international schools around the world. Every one of our teachers is a life-long learner, keen to maintain the highest level of subject knowledge and to keep abreast of the latest developments in pedagogical best practice. Our parents know that they can count on the commitment and dedication of a highly qualified team who set themselves and their students the very highest standards.

New Courses

At the start of the 2017/18 academic year in September, we will be introducing significant new areas of study for our older students. These include university entry-level courses in Computer Science, Economics and – further strengthening our highly successful arts programme – Drama & Theatre Studies.

Broad Perspectives

BST is, of course, much more than an A Level school. All examinations are important, and many parents are impressed by the rigour and structured progression of our particular brand of British education from the age of three through to 18. That said, our young people here know that education is not simply about passing exams. Sport, music and drama are woven into the fabric of school life, and we see both community service and adventurous activity as significant strengths.

For more information, visit www.bst.ac.jp


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2 Comments
  1. BST is a great enviornment for children – there’s no bullying (that I can see) and the children enjoy going there.

    But it’s not stereotype free. The biggest stereotype is from the school itself which assume that every family is a working dad (probably an expat) with a housewife mum living in company supplied accommodation a walk or short car ride from the school. It’s ingrained into the staff and unfortunately the children pick it up – not good when you have a daughter. For a working mum like me it’s very frustrating!

    Important talks on kids education are held at time working parents can’t attend, even though they could be held on public holiday when children have to attend the school.

    The numerous “please come in an help us do X Y Z” days usually only get mums coming in. Some could also be held on public holidays.

    It’s a good school but I wish they would consider dual working parents more instead of encouraging the stay at home mum stereotype.

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