Green Reading—Naturally!

Environment Trends & Culture - March 5th, 2010
Photo by [JO]² - Immortal Lens -( Youssef Hanna )RESIZE

by Danielle Rippingale

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” –Margaret Mead

In Tokyo, the commute by train offers the perfect opportunity to read the books you’ve been wanting to, but can’t seem to find the time otherwise. ‘Green reads’ deal with environmental issues that are often complex and controversial,but also undoubtedly inspire and remind us that we heal ourselves by healing the earth. This list of highly recommended books are written by scientists, journalists and novelists, and provide information that is not only fascinating, but also essential if we want to live healthy and well. Drawing upon new and old publications for both budding and well-versed environmentalists, they all have the ability to go to the heart of the matter, whether they’re grappling with global warming, pollution, agriculture, energy or extinction. Before you purchase a paper book, ask your friends what green reads they have, visit your ward library (you never know), or purchase as an electronic or audio book.

This list of highly recommended books are written by scientists, journalists and novelists, and provide information that is not only fascinating, but also essential if we want to live healthy and well. Drawing upon new and old publications for both budding and well-versed environmentalists, they all have the ability to go to the heart of the matter, whether they’re grappling with global warming, pollution, agriculture, energy or extinction. Before you purchase a paper book, ask your friends what green reads they have, visit your ward library (you never know), or purchase as an electronic or audio book.

Popular must-reads for the budding ‘greenie’:

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life, by Barbara Kingsolver

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, by

William McDonough and Michael Braungart

Worldchanging: A User’s Guide for the 21st Century, by

Alex Steffen, Al Gore, and Stephan Sagmeister

The Lazy Environmentalist: Your Guide to Easy,

Stylish, Green Living, by Josh Dorfman

The Secret History of the War on Cancer, by Devra Davis

Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet, by Mark Lynas

An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global

Warming and What We Can Do About It, by Al Gore

The Omnivore’s Dilemma, by Michael Pollan

Slow Death by Rubber Duck, by Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie

Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet, by Jeffrey Sachs

In Defense of Food, by Michael Pollan

Climate Solutions: A Citizen’s Guide, by Peter Barnes

Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the

World Food System, by Raj Patel

ECO FACT

While much of the world is buzzing about the upcoming

release of the latest e-book device, Apple’s iPad, your daily

train commute will quickly attest that cell phones (and good

ol’ paper books) are still king in Japan. Despite the Japanese

love affair with electronic gadgets, it is likely that the

failure here to embrace e-books is because e-readers like

Kindle fail to support the Japanese language, and Japanese

publishers aren’t releasing their books on e-readers.

Bottomfeeder: How to Eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood, by Taras Grescoe

End of the Line, by Charles Clover

Walden, by Henry David Thoreau

Greasy Rider: Two Dudes, One Fry-Oil-Powered Car, and a Cross-Country Search for a Greener Future, by Greg Melville

Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution—and How It Can Renew America, by Thomas L. Friedman

Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet, by Mark Lynas

Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist’s Guide to

Global Warming, by Bjørn Lomborg

The Unnatural History of the Sea, by Callum Roberts

Field Notes from a Catastrophe, by Elizabeth Kolbert

Garbage Land, by Elizabeth Royte

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, by Jared Diamond

The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing the Climate and

What It Means for Life on Earth, by Tim Flannery

Fruitless Fall: The Collapse of the Honeybee and the

Coming Agricultural Crisis, by Rowan Jacobsen

Fast Food Nation, by Eric Schlosser

The Skeptical Environmentalist, by Bjorn Lomborg

Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial

Revolution, by Paul Hawken et al.

…and more serious reading for the seasoned’ greenie’:

Design Like You Give a Damn: Architectural Responses to Humanitarian Crises, by Kate Stohr (Architecture for Humanity)

The Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty- First Century, by James Howard Kunstler

Plan B 2.0: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and a Civilization in Trouble, by Lester R. Brown

American Earth: Environmental Writing since Thoreau, edited by Bill McKibben

Trespass: Living at the Edge of the Promised Land, by Amy Irvine

Blessed Unrest: How the Largest Movement in the World Came into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming, by Paul Hawken.

Terra: Our 100-Million-Year-Old Ecosystem and the Threats That Now Put It at Risk, by Michael Novacek

Uncertain Peril: Genetic Engineering and the Future

of Seeds, by Claire Hope Cummings

External Link:
Green Reading Blog